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Trip to Jordan - Google Translation

Wadi Rum, Flora

Wadi rum Flora, jordan

Salt Bush

Scientific name: Atriplex halimus
Family: Chenopodiaceae
English common name: Saltbush, Tall Orache, and Spanish Sea Purslane
Arabic common name: Kataf milhi

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Edom_Iris

Scientific name: Iris edomensis
Family: Iridaceae
English common name: Edom iris
Arabic common name: Sawsan edom

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Scientific name: Atriplex halimus
Family: Chenopodiaceae
English common name: Saltbush, Tall Orache, and Spanish Sea Purslane
Arabic common name: Kataf milhi


 


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Sal Bush, Wadi rum The earth is in love, now is the time to sow! The anemone, traditionally identified as the 'lily of the field', is used as an indicator of the proper time for sowing for it flowers from late winter (February) to early spring (April). Flowers are cherry red with a black center. It has been said that not even Solomon in his entire splendor was dressed like one of these. With the beginning of winter rains, the rhizome sends new leaves. It is widespread in the Mediterranean region and its flowers can be found in several colors, namely purple or pink, and rarely white. In Jordan, you can find it in wastelands almost everywhere around the northern part of the country down till Karak and Tafila. This flower can be used for planting in rock gardens, beds, borders, and woodland gardens, simply by collecting it's seeds and planting them in the fall; it requires sun or light shade and sheltered spot


Scientific name: Iris edomensis
Family: Iridaceae
English common name: Edom iris
Arabic common name: Sawsan edom


 


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Edom Iris , Wadi rum Look around you for the tops of pillars in Jarash and Umm Qays. Can you see some plant leaf designs? It's the Acanthus! But it's not only found here. The leaves of this plant characterize the Corinthian capitals' architecture. The legend that explains how the sculptors were first inspired by this plant goes like this. The Athenian bronze sculptor, Callimachus, had come upon a child's grave. On it was a basket filled with her toys topped with a large floor tile to protect it from the weather. Since the burial, an acanthus plant had sprouted beneath the basket and its leaves had come through the basket and curled up around the edges to lick the bottom of the tile. From this image came the Corinthian capital, which is a stylized basket wrapped in acanthus leaf. The plant, native to Middle East, is a very good candidate for ornamental plants. If you just have some stony grounds with red soils, that are well drained, then you can have this historical plant in your garden. Collect the seeds from the wild; it's widespread in rocky areas all over Jordan. Soak seeds in warm water for 36 hours. Germination occurs irregularly, often over several months.